Commemorating Flight 387 of Cebu Pacific – Mount Sumagaya (Mount Lumot traverse) PART II

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Conquering mountains is not just a hobby, past time or sports. It is an opportunity to witnessed how magnificent God is – views that few people can behold and blissfully cherish on it. Also, it teaches us on how to be positive despite of having hard time conquering the summit. In mountaineering, you will learn to appreciate and enjoy the small luxuries in life like the water we normally drink in the city or at home,  when you have it at the summit, it is like you’re having the most potable water you had in your life. These are few reasons on why climbing a mountain is an addiction. This traverse provides us with an unforgettable moments in life. In this climb, I met new friends, new learning opportunities and another lessons in life.

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7 hours of sleep was good enough for us to be rejuvenated and recharged for our next destination. The part II of this entry includes our adventure on traversing Mount Lumot.

It was called “Lumot” for a very obvious reason. Majority of the trail are covered with moss. Unlike the mossy part of Mount Talomo, Dulang-dulang, Kalatungan-Wiji traverse, I will commend this mountain as the mossiest among all that I climbed.

We resume trekking around 8:30 AM. Our initial plan was to resume it around 7:30 AM but due to chilly and cold temperature, the itinerary was moved and adjusted. From Sumagaya peak, it will take around 5-6 hours trekking to reached Camp Neil Perez, the most nearest and convenient campsite of Mount Lumot if you’re coming from Sumagaya.

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As we start entering the mossy part of Mount Lumot, a lot of logs and big trunks are on our way which forced us to crawled, ducked and carefully stepped on firmed grounds. The specs of the trail is akin to those of Mount Talomo (mossy part) but more complicated and the moss were very prominent and thick. Majority of the trail were purely moss and the whole 5-6 hours trekking are more on crawling, ducking and balancing at big logs. In Sumagaya, our only complained was the non-stop ascend but in Lumot, unending narrow and perplexing trail are the struggle one which is sometimes misleads us on the right way/trail.

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The mossy trail of Mount Lumot

Luckily we were blessed with an awesome weather making our pacing a bit faster. As we proceed, the trail makes us more exhilarating as moss are getting thicker and brighter as the radiant rays of the sun hits. Along with that, we were very cautious as the ground were filled with a marshmallow-like consistency which were made mostly of soil, moss and accumulated roots and leaves. The perks of this trail is that, there were no open trail which makes the environment a bit colder.

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Mount Sumagaya and Mount Lumot are not separate mountains unlike in Kitanglad and Dulang-dulang, or Kalatungan and Wiji; they have a continuous trail in which it won’t need the hikers to stepped down then again ascend just like in Kitanglad and Dulang-dulang trail. In terms of summit, Mount Lumot don’t have a definite peak and landmark unlike in Sumagaya. The whole mossy surroundings is what this mountain can provide to the hikers. In the middle of the trail, a water source is available and a rest area.

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At the crash site

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We arrived at the crash site around 1:30 PM. Some of the plane’s debris were being stolen and some are being misplaced brought by floods and heavy rain as what Elizalde (porter/guide) said. Mount Lumot is famous on their folklore that’s why it is called the “Mountain of the souls”. There were myths and stories about crying souls of those crash victims which can sometimes be heard (for those having third eye or any supernatural gifts). Some of my friends are bit scared as they hear those folklore. (Well, let’s see if it’s true or not haha). Passed the plane debris, mossy forest continues and nearby the campsite, you can see the garments and stewardess coat being hanged on a stick. So creepy to think that there might be a ghost that would appeared on us. *Woooooo. 

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Going to Neil Perez Campsite

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At Camp Neil Perez
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Free flowing water source

We arrived at Camp Neil Perez at 2 PM which is also the nearest campsite after the impact site. So thankful that we are done agonizing the 5-6 hours tortured and acrobatic trekking phase. *What a relief! We immediately go to the water source to get some water haha! Oh wait, I didn’t warned everyone. Please be aware that there are a lot of limatiks or blood leeches here in Mount Lumot, so please be mindful and take good care if you will going to set your camp here. Anyways, we had our late lunch and early dinner as one after we finished setting our camps then have our socials right after.

We woke up early and prepared our breakfast for us to arrived at Brgy. Lunotan (Jump off of Mount Lumot). The supposed to be 8 AM departure time were moved due to chilly weather together with a whispering and cold air which cause us to procrastinate, and so we decided to resume it at 9 AM. Good thing, we have a beautiful weather and no any signs of murky skies. Yey! Just a brief history of Neil Perez Camp. Neil Perez was a local guide who died on their Mount Kanlaon climb. Elizalde told us that he has tuberculosis at that time and died on the said mountain.

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Leaving the campsite.

Descending Mount Lumot was also a challenging part as the trail was a complete steep. The trail is similar to Sumagaya (referring to the ascend part). Virginal forest is pretty obvious and therefore the trail is well preserved. We used the old trail because the current trail at that time was temporarily been closed due to soil erosion. The older trail was a longer and has a lot of steep and sloping terrain.

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This river (I forgot the name) is the landmark that you’re near on the shrine (Jump off of Lumot). *Finally! By the way, the old trail that I’ve mentioned a while ago was called the “Lope Domingo Trail”. We took our lunch and at the same time took some rest. The river was tempting us to took a bath but we decided to have it at the shrine. 🙂

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Open trail going to shrine
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Wooden bridge going to shrine
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At the shrine
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Picture taking!

At last! We arrived at the shrine at 12:30 in the afternoon. the sun and heat were unbearable. Taking a bath is the first thing that we’ve got on our mind. While waiting for a motorcycle, we immediately took a bath. *So refreshing! haha

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We gonna miss this adventure. huhu!
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The famous ABS-CBN landmark at the shrine

As I looked back at the mountain, I couldn’t believed that we were able to successfully traversed the said mountain. We were very fortunate because some of the mountaineers who were able to climb this mountain didn’t succeeded because mainly of bad weather. They were forced to do back trail and sadly aborted it.

The complete traverse was truly a fulfillment and for me, a big achievement. We were very blessed in so many ways. We have a very good weather and no one’s got injured; we arrived safely and lastly we have a very professional and accommodating event organizer,  Anjo Dorado. I will commend him for his utmost guidance and for taking good care of us.

I would like to thank my company on this climb: Ian, Terrence, Dave and Cherie for the opportunity to have you on this one-of-my-bucket list climb. Thanks for the friendship and I hope that our friendship will not end here. Add-add nalang tayo sa facebook haha! Also to our porter, Elizalde for being so patient on us even if we have a slow pacing still you never left us; for entertaining us while we’re on the camp; for answering my non-sense questions. haha! Lastly to God for having us a very welcoming weather, for protecting and guiding us throughout this adventure. As much as possible, if you are in a climb especially having a multi-day  traverse, always have the necessary things to bring for you to be protected from any unpredictable circumstances that might occur during your adventure (heavy rain, injury, etc).

Another adventure to be remembered and cherished. By this, I am more ready and ecstatic on my next adventure: the 4 peak traverse of Kitanglad Ranges which are composed of: (1) Kitanglad, (2) Dulang-dulang, (3) Langkayugan, and (4) Maagnaw.

Again, see you on my next blog post! 🙂


TIPS AND REMINDERS: 

1. This climb is not advisable for beginners for this a multi-day traverse. I strongly encourage you to have a couple of minor climb or day-hike climb OR take at least 2-3x a week jogging plus daily climbers exercise (see Youtube on how to do it) to condition yourself from the difficulty of this mountain. DO NOT TAKE THIS CLIMB IF YOU ARE A FIRST TIMER.

2. Bring all the necessary things especially those that can protect you from the uncertainties of the weather. For electronic gadgets (cellphone, power bank, flashlight, headlight), please have it fully charged and placed it on a zip lock or plastic bag.

3. It is advisable to have an event organizer for this traverse. Just like what I have mentioned on PART I of this blog, logistics is quite hassle. (please refer on the link I incorporated for contact information and instructions on how to get there).

4. It’s a must to bring a tent, trapal, raincoat/rain jacket or poncho, cold weather gears (jackets, fleeces, gloves, headwear, etc), earthpad/footprint. I separately remind this part because there are some mountaineers especially here in Mindanao that tends to bring only hammock and trapal and sleeping bag only aside from the primary things to bring. This mountain is quite moody so much better to be ready at all times.

5. The trail has a lot of LIMATIKS or blood leeches. It is advisable to wear light colored gears for you to quickly noticed the dark-colored leeches. Avoid wearing sandos, sandals and any open gears for it is very easy for them to gain access and suck you blood. If you are being suck/bite, just apply a flame or alcohol-based solution. Pulling them is the most common way but it is not advisable for it will worsen the bleeding. AFTERCARE: just always clean the wound, cover it with bandage or gauze. Avoid scratching as much as possible for it may irritate the injured site. For more information about limatiks and it’s aftercare and precautions, just visit pinoymountaineer.com.

6. Always remember the LNT principle. Do not throw your garbage/trash elsewhere. Always bring a cellophane for your own garbage. BE A RESPONSIBLE MOUNTAINEER. 🙂

7. In packing your items, along with your bag, insert a large plastic bag and put all your gears and belongings inside to avoid being wet brought by the rain. Do not just rely on the rain cover of your bag. 🙂

8. For the food, have it on a separate plastic bag especially if you wish to have a meaty dishes. To avoid being spoiled, have it in a pre-cook manner then put it on a separate container (plastic bag/tupperware/cookset). Estimate your food just enough for a 3-4 days supply. Bring also trail foods such as jelly ace, nuts, chocolates, etc.

9. It is a must to bring medicine such as anti-pyretics, NSAID or pain reliever, anti-histamine, meds for diarrhea and other first aid equipments.

10. A week or day prior to proper climb, avoid doing stressful activities for you to save energy on the day of the climb.

11. In terms of water sources, no worries because this traverse has a lot of water sources. 🙂

12. Lastly, pray and ask for God’s guidance before starting your adventure. It is best to ask for His guidance and protection to avoid any injuries or unpredictable circumstances so that you can enjoy the rest of the adventure. 🙂

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5 thoughts on “Commemorating Flight 387 of Cebu Pacific – Mount Sumagaya (Mount Lumot traverse) PART II

    […] useful tips and reminders, just visit the PART II of this […]

    Like

    dominica jane s tecson said:
    December 5, 2016 at 4:42 am

    Hi! May i ask kung meron po ba kayong contact number ni Sir Anjo? Kasi we were planning to go there next week. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

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